Dr Jim Hamill's Posts (141)

If you work in field services or as a tech strategist/consultant in mobile and remote work, I think you may find this conversation interesting. Everything about the future of work is being reimagined. 

An interesting podcast discussion, with transcript, between futurist Brian Solis, ZDNet and Sodexo for the Savvy Business Leaders podcast series.

The conversation quickly expanded beyond the realm of field service management to explore all digital trends that are affecting and empowering businesses in all industries at every level. 

 

Read the full article here.

Jim H

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The main findings from our Public Sector Digital Leaders Forum held on 1st November last year are now available.

Using an Interactive Audience Polling Tool, the results provide a very useful snapshot of the state of public sector digital transformation in Scotland year end 2018.

While there is growing acceptance of the need for Scotland’s public sector to transform digitally, only limited progress has been made in leveraging the full potential of emerging technologies for enhancing the citizen experience; building efficient, agile digital workplaces; and reimagining service delivery.

Most public sector organisations in Scotland remain fixed at an early experimental stage on their transformation journey. Few have yet fully embedded digital technology at the core of everything they do.

 Key Findings

  • Despite wide acceptance that digital can deliver more cost efficient, agile and citizen focused public services, fewer than half of public sector organisations in Scotland view digital supported transformation as being ‘mission critical’.
  • Fewer than one-third have an agreed digital transformation strategy in place providing a roadmap for change.
  • Progress in transforming service delivery has been slow with 81 percent of respondents stating that ‘little or only limited’ progress has been made. Only 15 per cent stated that ‘good progress’ was being made in digitally transforming service delivery.
  • The absence of digital leadership, organisational culture issues and digital skills shortages were identified as the three most important barriers to transformational change in Scotland’s public sector. Seventy-three per cent of respondents stated that their organisation lacked digital leadership. Other barriers to progress included fear, funding, resources and perceived risk.
  • Externally, few public sector organisations are leveraging the full potential of digital for delivering exceptional customer experiences at Key Moments of Truth in the customer journey. Only 15 percent of respondents stated that they were making good progress in this area.
  • Internally, many public sector organisations in Scotland continue to exhibit the classic symptoms of pre-digital workplaces - hierarchical, bureaucratic and controlling organisational structures; silos; ‘productivity busters’ such as excessive use of e-mail and numerous meetings; legacy technology and legacy management thinking; lack of innovation and staff engagement; poor communications; decision-making based on hunch rather than analytics.
  • Less than a third of respondents agreed that digital natives would find their organisation an attractive place to work.

Public sector digital transformation was one of the core objectives stated in the updated National Digital Strategy for Scotland published in March 2017. The results from our recent Forum suggest that considerable progress still needs to be made before the vision of "matching the expansion of digital public services with reform of the structure and ways of working of the organisations that deliver them" is achieved.

How can we accelerate digital supported transformation in Scotland's public sector?

A more detailed report covering the main findings from our Forum will be available very shortly.

As always, grateful for your thoughts and feedback on this.

Jim H

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Welcome to the Online Resource Hub for the Leading Digital Transformation Programme - an executive level programme providing participants with the knowledge and practical skills for developing, implementing and proactively managing successful transformation strategies 'fit-for-purpose' in an era of turbulent change and digital disruption. The Online Hub presents the core reading and other support material relevant to all modes of programme delivery including our two-day Executive Masterclasses, MBA Modules, industry specific and in-company delivery. Content is updated on a regular basis ensuring that the most recent and relevant research is included. This introductory module presents a brief overview of the programme, course material, readings and other support material.
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Over the next few years, the convergence of a broad range of disruptive technologies, and associated societal changes, will reshape industries, markets and the public sector faster than at any time in history. Hyper awareness of these trends, the external digital landscape, the disruptive technologies and associated societal changes reshaping your industry, the opportunities and threats presented for your own organisation is a key trait of a successful leader of change for the digital era. The overall aim of Module 1 is to present a framework for evaluating the current and future state of digital disruption in your industry, the key technologies involved, emerging opportunities & threats and likely impact on your own organisation. The key question addressed is 'to what extent will your industry, your organisation be disrupted; to what extent will you be disrupted?". Links for additional background reading are provided.
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Module 2: External Digital

The rapid emergence of a new generation of constantly connected, empowered customers (B2C and B2B), is leading to the ‘end of marketing as usual’. With customers no longer being passive recipients of brand messages, traditional broadcast approaches to sales, marketing, PR and customer service are declining in effectiveness. Module 2 examines the use of digital and social media technologies for building customer engagement; the new rules of sales, marketing and PR in a digital era; social customer service; content marketing; big data and predictive analytics; real time engagement as the new marketing. The ‘old’ rules of mainstream media are about controlling the message. Because of the digital and social media revolutions, a new approach is required based on the principles of Inbound/Content Marketing and Social Customer Service. Content and engagement NOT broadcasting. Marketing as a two-way conversation with customers.
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Module 3: Internal Digital

Current and emerging digital technologies provide exciting opportunities for your organisation to rethink the way you operated, the way you work, breaking free from the limits imposed by outdated legacy systems. Module 3 asks you to evaluate your organisation’s current use of digital technology internally to improve operating efficiency, reduce costs, building an agile, fast moving, responsive organisation ‘fit-for-purpose’ in an era of turbulent change; identifying areas for future improvement. Key issues covered include the use of digital and social technologies within the business to improve internal communications and knowledge transfer; achieve operational efficiencies; build agile, fast moving flexible organisations; improve staff engagement and morale; drive change towards a more customer centred organisational culture. ‘Enterprise Social’ tools and software. Big data, the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0.
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There is growing evidence that ‘transformation planning pays’. In other words, ‘leading digital’ organisations who plan and manage their transformation programmes well consistently outperform 'digital laggards'. The next two modules of the class are very closely linked. In this module we present a framework covering the key steps involved in developing a transformation strategy ‘fit-for-purpose’ in a digital era. This includes - agreeing a vision; strategic objectives; being customer led; the key actions and initiatives you need to take; organisation, culture and people issues; performance measurement. Module 5 discusses implementation issues, overcoming the barriers and obstacles to change within your organisation.
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Following our discussion in Module 4 on transformation strategy development, this module focuses on the issues and challenges facing organisations in implementing digital supported transformation programmes. The module asks you to identify the main barriers and obstacles to successful transformation in your own organisation, proposing solutions on how these can be overcome. We also touch briefly on the issue of digital transformation performance measurement and the key traits of a successful change leader. As we move from the WHY to the HOW of digital transformation, greater attention is now being paid to these implementation issues, especially the main barriers and obstacles standing in the way of effective change. There is growing acceptance that the main change barriers are organisation, people and culture related NOT technology; legacy management thinking rather than legacy technology. Leaders of change for the digital era and digital change agents are urgently required!
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While enormous resources are being spent on digital transformation programmes by the private sector, the results are underwhelming. According to estimates, this year over $1.2 trillion will be spent by companies worldwide on their digital transformation efforts and yet analysis suggests that only 1% of these efforts will actually achieve or exceed their expectations.

The Digital Enterprise: Moving from experimentation to transformation is a practical guide on how to envision, structure, and sequence successful digital transformation efforts. It is an effort by the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Bain & Company, to help senior executives avoid common patterns of failure and ask the right questions.

Eight early stage failure patterns were identified:

Take care.

Jim H

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Capgemini's recent report Understanding Digital Mastery Today is required reading for anyone invloved in leading digital transformation programmes.

You are not alone in the barriers and obstacles you face!

Based on an extenisve survey of 1,300 executives in over 750 global organisations, the research concludes that many are finding their digital transformation journeys a real struggle. Only a minority of the organisations surveyed have the digital (39%) and managerial (35%) capacities needed to make their digital transformation successful.

Worringly, there has been a significant decline in organisations' general readiness for digital transformation compared to an identical survey carried out six years ago.

The research confims our long-held belief that digital leaders are urgently required.

You can access the full report here - Understanding Digital Mastery Today

The Infographic below presents a snapshot of main findings (please click to enlarge). 

Source: Capgemini, 2018

The implications of these finding will be discussed in more detail at our next Digital Leaders Masterclass taking place on the 4th/5th October, 2018 - Digital Leaders Masterclass.

As always, comment and feedback are very welcome.

Jim H

www.linkedin.com/in/drjimhamill

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Leadership in a Digital Era

The changes brought about by the Internet over the last twenty years are nothing compared to what is coming over the next few years. A convergence of disruptive technologies, combined with the rapid emergence of a new generation of constantly connected, empowered customers and employees (Gen C), is threatening to reshape markets faster than at any time in history.

No industry, no organisation is immune from the threat of being disrupted; just ask your local taxi driver (Uber) or Guest House owner (Airbnb). With labour markets being transformed by artificial intelligence and automation, no individual is immune. 375 million people worldwide may have to switch occupation category by 2030 according to one study (McKinsey, 2018).

Transforming digitally is the number one business challenge facing organisations today. Nothing else comes close. Staying relevant in a digital world is the number one personal challenge we all face.

Digital Leaders STILL Urgently Required

While there is growing acceptance of the need for our organisations to #adaptordie, do we have the digital leaders to drive change? Do our organisations have the leadership capabilities to succeed in a digital era?

Recent research from Capgemini would suggest not – “Understanding Digital Mastery Today: Why Companies are Struggling with their Digital Transformations (2018).”

Based on responses from more than 1,300 business leaders, representing 750 organisations, the study concluded that over 60 per cent of companies lack the digital capacities to drive transformational change. In most of the organisations surveyed, transformation was still at a nascent stage, with only 39 per cent having the digital or managerial (35%) capacities required to implement successful change.

Source: Capgemini, 2018

The Capgemini findings are supported by our own research in this area.

Since April of this year, senior managers representing 200 organisations from 20+ countries have attended our Digital Leadership Masterclasses.  A live Interactive Polling Tool was used to provide high level insight into the State of Digital Transformation 2018 covering the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Key headline findings are as follows:

  • Eighty-six per cent of executives agreed that their industry/their organisation is under threat of being disrupted. Twenty-five per cent stated that ‘big bang’ disruption is taking place NOW.
  • A broad range of technologies and societal changes were identified as having a disruptive impact including mobile connectivity; social media; the cloud; big data & predictive analytics; Internet of Things/Industry 4.0; digital workplaces; artificial intelligence, automation & robotics; 3D printing (additive manufacturing); wearables; augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR); autonomous vehicles/drones; and the Blockchain.
  • Despite growing awareness of the need for change, fewer than one-third of participants agreed that digital transformation had ‘already become mission critical’ for their organisation.
  • Fewer than 25 per cent of respondents claimed to have an agreed digital vision and strategy guiding the future direction of change.
  • Almost two-thirds of the organisations polled (62%) stated that they were facing a digital leadership crisis ‘at least to some extent’.

The Key Traits of a Successful Digital Leader.

Successful digital transformation is first and foremost about changing people, organisation and culture. Technology is just the facilitator of change.

Consequently, a new breed of senior executive is required - leaders of change for the digital era; leaders combining high level business knowledge, experience and understanding with the ability to develop and implement digital transformation strategies fully aligned with and supportive of agreed business outcomes. Leaders who possess both the confidence and personal skills to drive digital supported organisational and people change.

Successful leaders of change for the digital era require a broad range of hybrid skills and experience as shown in the tag cloud below. ‘Knowing about IT stuff’ is no longer enough.

Source: Based on 200 respondents to our Workshop Polling Tool.

Based on the above, we would suggest ten key traits of an effective leader of change for the digital era:

  1. Hyper awareness of the external digital landscape, the disruptive technologies and associated societal changes reshaping industry.
  2. The ability to develop a clear digital vision and strategy fully aligned with and supportive of agreed business goals and objectives.
  3. Identification and prioritisation of digital initiatives combined with strong digital governance skills to prevent a proliferation of uncoordinated activity.
  4. The ability to win senior management/board support, commitment and resource to drive organisational transformation.
  5. Strong project and programme management skills. The ability to deliver change ‘on time within budget’; the tenacity to keep transformation programmes on target.
  6. Change management competencies. The personal skills and empathy to overcome organisational, people and cultural barriers to change.
  7. Hybrid management skills (technology AND people) to break down organisational silos, restructuring the organisation around customer journeys.
  8. A strong focus on performance measurement but with the ability to be flexible depending on changing circumstances.
  9. Informed decision-making based on actionable insight derived from data and advanced analytics.
  10. A future looking perspective to cope with the rapid pace of digital change taking place.

Given the strong link that exists between digital maturity and future competitiveness, these are worrying statistics.

Even more worrying is the sharp decline in firms’ general readiness for digital transformation compared to an identical study carried out six years ago - Capgemini Consulting and MIT Sloan’s 2012 report, “The Digital Advantage: How Digital Peers Outperform Their Peers in Every Industry”; a report which provided the basis for the best-selling ‘Leading Digital‘ book.

Despite the huge investments currently taking place in digital transformation initiatives, set to exceed $2 trillion by 2021, most organisations today feel less equipped with the right digital leadership skills compared to 2012. Many current initiatives will fail.

The challenge for organisations is to develop leaders of change for the digital era.

___________________________

Our next ‘Leading Digital’ Executive Masterclass, in association with the University of Edinburgh Business School, takes place on the 4th/5th October, 2018. Full details can be found here - Digital Leaders Masterclass.

If interested in coming along, please do not hesitate to contact me for an informal chat.

As always, comment and feedback are very welcome.

Dr Jim Hamill

www.linkedin.com/in/drjimhamill

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One for discussion at our next 'Leading Digital' Masterclass, Digital Landscape Analysis session. 

Gartner has recently presented their top 10 strategic technology trends for 2019.

The emerging technologies likely to have the most disruptive impact over the next five years include:

1. Autonomous things

By the year 2021,10% of new vehicles will have autonomous driving capabilities, up from 1% in 2017. Major automobile manufacturers will reach level four autonomous driving by 2021, which bascially means the car will drive itself.

2. Augmented analytics

The number of citizen data scientists will grow five times faster than the number of expert data scientists, supported by augmented analytics and AI.

3. AI-driven development

By 2022, 40% of new application development projects will have AI co-developers on their teams.

4. Digital twins

50% of large industrial companies will use digital twins by 2021 generating significant improvements in productivity and efficiency. A digital twin is a digital representation of a physical object e.g. factory, oil filed etc.

 5. Empowered edge

Storage, computing and advanced AI and analytics capabilities will expand the capabilities of edge devices through 2028.

6. Immersive experience

70% of enterprises will be experimenting with immersive technologies for consumer and enterprise use by 2022.

7. Blockchain

The blockchain will create $3.1 trillion in business value by 2030.

8. Privacy and ethics

By 2021, organisations lacking in privacy protection will pay 100% more in compliance costs than best-practice-adhering competitors.

9. Smart spaces

Smart spaces, physical or digital environments populated by humans and enabled by technology, will become increasingly connected, intelligent and autonomous.

10. Quantum computing

By 2023, 20% of organisations will be budgeting for quantum computing projects compared to less than 1% today.

Hyper awareness of the external digital landscape; the disruptive technologies and associated societal changes reshaping your industry; the opportunities and threats presented for your own organisation; the gap that exists between your organisation’s current level of digital maturity and where you should be, are key traits of a successful digital leader.

How will the trends identified by Gartner impact on your own organisation?

Detailed advice on undertaking a Digital Landscape Analysis will be presented during our next Digital Leaders Masterclass taking place on the 4th/5th October, 2018 in association with the University of Edinburgh Business School.

Please register if you would like to attend. I will then contact you to discuss in more detail.

Read the full article here.

Dr Jim Hamill

www.linkedin.com/in/drjimhamill

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Since May of this year, we have delivered eight of our highly regarded ‘Leading Digital’ Executive Masterclasses, including two five-day programmes, four three-day programmes and twice through online delivery over a five-week period.

Senior managers representing 200 organisations, from 20+ countries, have participated. A live Interactive Polling Tool was used to provide high level insight into the State of Digital Transformation 2018 covering the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Key highlight findings are summarised below:

1.  To what extent is your industry, your organisation, under threat of being disrupted?

Eighty-six per cent of executives agreed that their industry/their organisation was under threat of being disrupted. Twenty-five per cent stated that ‘big bang’ disruption is already taking place.

A broad range of technologies and societal changes were identified as having a disruptive impact including mobile connectivity; social media; the cloud; big data & predictive analytics; Internet of Things/Industry 4.0; digital workplaces; artificial intelligence, automation & robotics; 3D printing (additive manufacturing); wearables; augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR); autonomous vehicles/drones; the blockchain; together with the emergence of a new generation of constantly connected, empowered customers (Gen C - who have also become our constantly connected employees).

Note: Based on the Short Fuse: Big Bang model for evaluating the extent to which different industries will be digitally disrupted (size of the ‘bang’) and the time period over which disruption will take place (length of the ‘fuse’).

2.  To what extent is digital transformation a priority for your organisation?

Despite growing awareness of the need for change, fewer than one-third of participants agreed that digital transformation had ‘already become mission critical’ for their organisation. While transformation was ‘emerging as a priority’ in over half of the organisations surveyed, fewer than 25 per cent of respondents claimed to have an agreed digital vision and strategy guiding the future direction of change.

3.  List the main barriers and obstacles to transformation change within your organisation.

Participants identified a wide range of obstacles to the successful digital transformation of their organisation. Echoing other research in this area, people, organisation and culture, NOT technology, emerged as the main change barriers. Only five percent of those polled stated that their organisation had a well-developed action plan to overcome these barriers.

4.  Who is leading digital in your organisation?

A wide range of answers were received to this question ranging from ‘no one’ to the CEO. Almost two-thirds of the organisations polled (62%) stated that they were facing a digital leadership crisis ‘at least to some extent’.

5.   The key traits of a successful digital leader.

Successful digital transformation is first and foremost about changing people, organisation and culture. Technology is just the facilitator of change.

Consequently, a new breed of senior executive is required - leaders of change for the digital era; leaders combining high level business knowledge, experience and understanding with the ability to develop and implement digital transformation strategies fully aligned with and supportive of agreed business outcomes. Leaders who possess both the confidence and personal skills to drive digital supported organisational change.

Respondents agreed that successful leaders of change for the digital era required a combination of hybrid skills and experience as shown in the tag cloud below. ‘Knowing about IT stuff’ is no longer enough.

Our next ‘Leading Digital’ Executive Masterclass, in association with the University of Edinburgh Business School, takes place on the 4th/5th October, 2018. Full details can be found here - Digital Leaders Masterclass.

If interested in coming along, please do not hesitate to contact me for an informal chat.

As always, comment and feedback are very welcome.

Take care.

Jim H

 

 

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An interesting series of short videos from McKinsey profiling the digital transformation of DBS Bank based on an interview with CIO David Gledhill.

Highly relevant to our 'Leading Digital' workshops- The Three Key Elements; Digital to the Core; Our Rallying Call: Becoming the "D" in GANDALF; Our Outcomes; A Scorecard for our Mission; Advice for Others on this Journey.

"The digital transformation of any enterprise is a herculean task requiring a willingness to embrace cultural change, the ability to immerse the entire organization in the customer journey, and a total commitment to digitize to the core. DBS Bank Chief Information Officer David Gledhill shares his insights on DBS’s digital transformation with McKinsey’s Vinayak HV, a partner in the Singapore office".

 The Three Key Elements

 

Digital to the Core

Our Rallying Call: Becoming the "D" in GANDALF

Our Outcomes

A Scorecard for our Mission

Advice for Others on this Journey

The full article can be found here.

Jim H

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Football fans (soccer to our North American friends) should find the two videos below to be of interest.

How Bayern Munchen uses digital technology to enhance the fan experience at the Allianz Arena.

A big thank you to 'Gunner' fan Mohammed AlGhazali from the Strathclyde Business School MBA programme (Bahrain) for showing me these during the recent Digital Leaders workshop in Abu Dhabi.

Having experienced every senior football ground in Scotland, annually for the last 50 plus years, the only thing i can add is 'if only'.

Take care.

Jim H

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According to a recent report by Capgemini Consulting, organisations are now convinced of the benefits AI can bring. The key question now is where and how they should invest.

The research, freely available here Turning AI into concrete value: the successful implementers’ toolkit, offers a pragmatic guide helping organisations in their AI investment decisions.

Based on an analysis of over 50 AI use cases, together with a survey of over 1,000 senior executives, the report presents interesting case examples of AI delivering tangible business benefits across a range of different industries. Highly practical advice is provided in terms of devleoping an AI strategy and roadmap for your own organisation.  

Implemented effectively, AI can deliver real business benefit in four main areas as summarised below:

Figure 1: How AI is Driving Business Benefits

The report also provides a useful definition of what Artificial Intelligence is.

"Artificial Intelligence encompasses a range of technologies that learn over time as they are exposed to more data. The definition we used in this report is that AI includes speech recognition, natural language, processing, semantic technology, biometrics, machine and deep learning, swarm intelligence, and chatbots or voice bots."

Figure 2: What is Artificial Intelligence

The full report can be accessed here - Turning AI into concrete value: the successful implementers’ toolkit

Jim H

 

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The concept of Digital Operating Advantage is one of the key issues discussed during our ‘Leading Digital’ Masterclasses.

It refers to the way in which organisations can leverage the full potential of emerging technologies to streamline internal processes and systems, improve efficiency, reduce costs, building a more collaborative, cost efficient, agile, responsive, data driven organisation, ‘fit-for-purpose’ in a digital age.

The successful deployment of an Enterprise Social Media (ESM) platform is critical in this respect as highlighted in the video below.

 

The key term above is ‘successful deployment’. While ESM platforms have been adopted by many organisations as the cornerstone of their internal digital transformation, new research published in the MITSloan Management Review suggests that expected benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, collaboration and efficiency are seldom realised. The main reason for this is poor ESM implementation.

Key conclusions of the research are as follows:

  • Employees often ‘get lost’ during the implementation of ESM platforms because of the disconnect between technology and the cultural change required to leverage the full potential of these platforms.
  • ESM is too often introduced into workplaces as a siloed system. A more strategic approach is required with ESM becoming a core component of an organisation’s digital portfolio, fully integrated with and supportive of employees’ daily work.
  • Too often, ESM is added to an already tangled web of technologies meant to support communication and collaboration. The net outcome is that fewer than 30% of employees and only 8% of executives contribute to ESM on a regular basis.
  • As more organisations become attracted to the benefits of digital workplaces, IT departments are asked to equip employees with a rich and integrated digital portfolio including team collaboration software, project management tools, chat-based software, internal knowledge management systems, intranets and so on. However, in most cases, there is a failure to articulate and communicate to employees how they are expected to use these tools in their day-to-day, job-related tasks.
  • The failure to articulate and communicate runs the risk of employees becoming lost in the transition to a more social, collaborative way of working. Connecting to ESM platforms often requires employees to disconnect from existing patterns of communication and collaboration such as email. This is not easy to achieve and can create resistance to change unless managed properly. Weaning people away from their email comfort blanket is no easy task.
  • To increase adoption and improve efficiency, ESM should be established as the hub connecting multiple IT systems, business applications, collaborative tools and other digital platforms. With proper integration, using APIs, employees should be able to access all digital platforms such as the corporate intranet, email, directories, document-sharing tools, forums, blogs, wikis and third-party web applications seamlessly from the ESM platform. Most ESM platforms such as Salesforce Chatter, Microsoft Yammer and Teams, Facebook Workplace etc offer open APIs that enable interoperability between ESM and other information technologies.

In conclusion, the MITSloan research supports our own contention that successful digital transformation is not just about technology – it requires the effective integration of strategy, people, processes, systems, organisation, culture AND technology.

The failure to recognise these mutual dependencies is one of the main reasons why many attempted transformations will fail. The successful implementation of Enterprise Social Media within your own organisation is a cultural as well as a technology challenge.

Read the full article here.

As always, comment and feedback are very welcome.

Take care.

Jim H

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Following our recent post Charting the Digital Transformation Genome, a HBR paper examines the reasons why some high profile digital transformation programmes fail based on the experiences of compaies such as GE, Lego, Nike, Procter & Gamble, Burberry, Ford and others. All case examples of heavy commitments to digital capability development which failed to meeet basic financial performance objectives.

The authors present four main reasons for failure:

First, there are a very wide range of factors that impact on a company's performance as much or even more than digital. Managers, therefore, should not view digital as a panacea.

Second, digital is not just about technology. Successful digital transformation is an ongoing process of changing the way you do business. It requires investment in new skills, people, projects, infrastructure as well as IT systems. It involves the integration of people, technology and business processes, combined with digital leadership, continuous monitoring and intervention from the top.

Third, digital investments need to be calibrated to the readiness of your industry, both customers and competitors, have a clear strategic fit with overall corporate objectives and hardwired to value.

Finally, companies should be careful that the investment in digital does not destroy traditional sources of comptitive advantage. The prospect of launching a sexy technology-based business can be tantalizing but can result in executives paying too much attention to the new and not enough to the old.

You can access the full article here - Why So Many High Profile Transformations Fail.

 Take care.

Jim H

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According to Anthony Abbatiello, principal, Deloitte Consulting and global leader of Deloitte Leadership, $400 billion is wasted every year in failed digital transformations. Even though many companies profess to have digital strategies, they don’t fully understand what it’s actually going to take or haven’t pinpointed what they want the business to look like.

There’s also an element of “executive tourism” as senior managers see things they like in Silicon Valley and seek to cut-and-paste them into their own organizations.

So, they embark on “random acts of digital” rather than create a cohesive strategy. They invest in digital technology and are disappointed when the expected massive change (and returns) don’t appear.

Despite such failure rates, digital transformation can be successful. But, it’s going to take a mind-set metamorphosis to put digital DNA at the organization’s core. HR has a critical role to play.

Read the full article here.

Jim H

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Since the digitization of music, the need to find new methods of access and distribution to music has become more prevalent. Since the birth of Napster, Kazaa, and Limewire, the music industry has taken a hit in terms of music sales. Listeners have easier access to content, while the creators of said content aren’t necessarily getting the bang for their buck.

So, how does introducing blockchain technology affect the accessibility and distribution of music? I turned to international house music DJ, Gareth Emery, and why his latest project, Choon, is the music industry of the future.

Read the full article here.

Jim H

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